2014 International Student Online Exhibition

WEB AD - 2014 Int Student Online Exhibit.jpgThe 2014 Fall International Student Online Exhibition presents submissions from current full-time student members of the Glass Art Society. All work was required to be current (made in 2013-2014), unique and contain glass as the main material. The artworks are featured below in alphabetical order. December 2014
 
 
COVER - 2014 Int Student Online Exhibit Juried Selection Catalogue.jpgIn addition to this exhibition GAS invited three distinguished jurors -Laura Donefer, Michael Endo and Amy Morgan- to select works from the many submissions. These are featured in the second Juried Selection Catalogue published on issuu.com. They also awarded 1st, 2nd, 3rd place winners***, honorable mentions** and additional selected works*. Juror comments are also included in the catalogue.  View the Juror Profiles and see the list of selected students featured in the catalogue.
 
 

An Exhibition of 78 Student Members

Representing 30 Schools and 8 Countries

 

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LAURA AALTO-SETÄLÄ
Aalto University
Helsinki, Finland

Three Flowers in a Vase

2014, 30 x 20 x 10 cm, hot worked and blown soda glass, sheet glass, UV glue.

I wanted to bring a contemporary touch to the object so much used in visual arts. In my work, flowers form a vase as they come together, piercing through the glass.

-graduate level

 

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NICHOLAS ADAMS
Australian National University
Canberra, Australia

Collectors Bowl: Rupees

2014, 5 x 15 x 15 cm, Slumped mosaic glass and murrini. Photo by Luis Power.

It interests me how an aesthetic of a certain era can be determined by the technology or lack thereof, available at that time. Using the traditional glass process; Murrini or Mosaic glass, I recreate images from a much more recent era, that being of 8-Bit retro video games. Specifically from games I played growing up, such as Zelda and Mario.

The imagery I chose for these games are often images that you would see multiples, these images were of collectables such as Mario coins, Zelda Rupees or PacEMan Pills. Due to the repetition of this imagery in the games it translated perfectly into this ancient glass process. My aim is to create valuable glass objects that are made using (close to) traditional methods, but has been combined with popular nerd/gaming culture.

-

 

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JAMES AKERS
Alfred University
Alfred, New York

Laserbeam Explosion

2014, 6 x 12 x 12 ft, neon, concrete. Photo by Mike Fleming.

The Laserbeam Explosion is a product of my subconscious. By making a list of words that I love, and refining that list, I was able to come up with ten words that inspired this piece; Color, Explosion, Dome, Earth, Lasers, Electric, Immersive, Vibrant, Wires, Modular.

-undergraduate level

 

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MARY AYLING
University of Michigan Ann Arbor
Ann Arbor, Michigan

***Featured in juried selection catalogue - Third place

Shaping Silence

2014, 1 x 1.25 x 1.5 in, cast lead crystal glass (relic created from a live performance. Thoughts.Silence.Time.) Photo by Math Monahan

I had a secret to share, but no one to tell.
No one was listening. So I tried to swallow it, but it sat there.
Calcifying in my mouth until I decide to give it to you.
Can you understand its shape now?

Shaping Silence was a performance where alginate was spooned into my mouth until it was full. I began saying a thought that had previously been lying silent. As I spoke, my words were muffled by the hardening alginate, simultaneously giving shape to my desired expression and choking on it. The secret took its final form in cast glass.

-graduate level

 

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EKIN AYTAC
West Texas A&M University
Canyon, Texas

Dripping

2014, 150 x 80 x 60 cm, blown glass

In this piece, I have worked on capturing a moment from a period of trickling water. Clear glass matches with its fluidic effect and creates perfect impression of the action. I am interested in material of glass because of its physical features. It is liquid when we are shaping it and it can still carry the effect of fluidity when it is solid. I like surprising and fun compositions. I am dealing with non-static running liquid forms in my composition.

-graduate level

 

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MICHAEL BAILEY
Southern Illinois University Carbondale
Carbondale, Illinois

Together / Apart

2014, 15.5 x 4 x 4 in, blown and cold-worked glass

Life has a flowing current that is affected by everything it touches. Most people know this but not everyone can see it happening. Clear glass, much like air tends to receive little attention due to its transparency. Yet, it is a necessary component that keeps the flow in motion. My work attempts to showcase this interaction of matter by shaving away the veiling layer which reveals its’ interworking elements through form and color.

-undergraduate level

 

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TERI BAILEY
University of Wisconsin Stevens Point
Stevens Point, Wisconsin

Degeneration

2014, 5 x 4 x 2 ft, hot sculpted sheet glass, thread, rope, wood

I created this piece during a time of crisis in my family. To me, the quilt symbolizes care and comfort, both things that were lacking from my home at the time. This piece is showing the slow, sad deterioration of this relationship, and the final moment when it has been broken beyond repair.

-undergraduate level

 
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STEPHANIE BANESS
Sheridan College
Oakville, ON Canada

Study #1

2013, sandcast glass with blown and sculpted inclusions

In my work, Study #1, I am interested in the optics of opaque and transparent glass. I use both sandblasted and transparent slices of blown glass to form layers that interplay with the underlying sandcasted design. As the light shines through the piece, the layers interact in a way that changes as you walk around the piece. My goal is to create a simple design that becomes more complex and engaging the longer it is viewed.

-undergraduate level

 
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JEAN-FRANCOIS BOIVIN
Espace Verre
Montreal, QC Canada

Communication

2013, 19.5 x 18 x 18 in, kiln-cast and cold worked glass, painted wood, pins, screws

In my work, I am mainly interested in people, human relationships. Social networks, the communications revolution, question me. Is it easier to share with each other thoughts, emotions and experiences? Who am I today; who is the other? Is communication facilitated by new technologies or becomes more difficult: the message is spoken but also visual. Many messages miss their goal. The screams and silence argue here between three characters: is there communication?

-undergraduate level

 

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JENNA BORGES
Tyler School of Art at Temple University
Philadelphia, Pennsylvania

*Included in juried selection catalogue - Selected work

2d Scan of 3d Movement

2014, hand held glass scanned with an open face computer scanner

This is an image of a three dimensional piece of glass that was scanned and turned into a two-dimensional image that shows movement and striations reminiscent of music or time.

-undergraduate level

 
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MICHAEL BOSVELD
Sheridan College
Oakville, ON Canada

Dedication

2013, 9 x 9.5 x 2.5, laminated float glass

As I find inspiration in every day experiences as well as nature, my work often relates to happiness, hope and faith. I am fascinated by creating work that intrigues the viewer to absorb the form and overall composition of the work in hopes that the artwork becomes less of an object and more of a feeling that they are able to relate to. Throughout my body of work, I attempt to capture the beauty of our world and inspire others.

-undergraduate level

 

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MORGAN CHIVERS
University of Texas at Arlington
Arlington, Texas

VIDEO - inertness is relative

2014, VIDEO (sculpture - 13 x 33 x 13 cm, sintered clear glass, inert gas, copper, electricity)

...surrounded by complete darkness, this echoes our condition: a delicate balance seen through radio waves.

The video explores the sculpture by slowly pulling the focus from the infinite to the macro, allowing each plane of glass to come into recognizable existence and fade into the haze before the next plane emerges into view. The photographic field of view is far narrower than with our biological eyes, so the viewer of the actual sculpture could never see the piece as filmed; the video becomes a technological mediated way to view a sculpture inspired by the requisite technological mediation of science in space.

-graduate level

 

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KATE CLEMENTS
Tyler School of Art at Temple University
Philadelphia, Pennsylvania

***Featured in juried selection catalogue - Second place

Untitled (WALL)

2013, 96 x 96 x 0.25 in, kiln-fired glass frit. Photo by Sam Frinch

Untitled (WALL) is assembled of over 40 separate lace-like parts that can be reconfigured to the size and space that it is installed in. The Amber Room and the front gate at Catherine Palace in Russia are inspiration for the decorative nature of the piece. Taking from the architecture of a palace and translating it into a glass wall or barrier evokes a conversation of facade and the fragility of image.

-graduate level

 

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MARCEL CORNETT
Ball State University
Indianapolis, Indiana

Keep and Bear Arms

2014, 24 x 30 x 3 in, Hot mold blown glass with cane in front of a print

This project incorporates a cane roll up into a hot blow mold. The concept stands on the idea of advancements of technology and advertising in the future. This artwork promotes an abstracted view of the right to carry guns of a difference time. I am speaking on the connection that society has with both media advancements and technology.

-undergraduate level

 
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JACCI DELANEY
Ohio State University
Columbus, Ohio

The Stoic Old Woman

2014, 12 x 16 x 0.5 in, glass, mirror, hologram, green laser, wires, black foam core. This is a laser viewable hologram made with the pulse laser holography machine. It can only be seen with a laser and the 9 mm curved mirror spreads the laser beam so we can see the hologram. The hologram is encased with glass to stay flat.

My work is the palette of human emotions that encircle us throughout our lives. People experience victories and losses in their lives and I’ve focused on loss, with a recent emphasis on coming through loss. I have been working with bubble wrap and I like how it’s easily recognizable as a protective material. I have used the protective qualities of bubble wrap to show closed down emotions in people and to reveal that the person is triumphing over that loss now. Bubble wrap has been wonderful for this because everyone sees bubble wrap as protecting fragile objects. We are our most protected fragile objects.

-graduate level *This piece was created with assistance from Dr. Harris Kagan.

 

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COURTNEY DOWNMAN
Sheridan College
Oakville, ON Canada

Wave Basin

2014, 4.5 x 7.5 x 7.5 in, blown, saw carved and flame polished glass. Photo by Tiffany Lefebvre

I was introduced to glass two years ago after enrolling in the Glass Craft and Design program at Sheridan College. I work mainly with blown glass but have also set up my own flameworking and glass fusing studio. I have been recognized by Sheridan College with two separate technical achievement awards and was chosen for a summer residency at the Harbourfront Centre glass studio. Enthralled with the possibilities of combining hot and cold processes, I strive to create a tactile experience while exploring the optical qualities of glass through carving and flame polishing processes.

-undergraduate level

 

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FIONA FAWCETT
University of Sunderland
Sunderland, United Kingdom

Search

2014, base - 16 x 14 cm narrowing to 12 cm at top, kiln cast glass using lost wax technique and hand polished. Photo by Jo Howell

My work is inspired by the natural environment and how man interacts with it. Search represents the challenges the maritime environment poses, a homage to those facing the physical challenges of this dynamic and extreme environment. Search relates to lost vessels at sea and its development coincided with the tragic loss of the aircraft MH370. Despite advanced technology man inevitably succumbs to the scale of the oceans; hampered by their endless horizons and fathomless depths. The optical distortion in Search invites a closer look for explanation. A metaphor for how we search for answers in life.

-undergraduate level

 

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ALEXANDRA FEENEY
Alfred University
Alfred, New York

*Included in juried selection catalogue - Selected Work

Peaked II

2014, 8 x 12 x 20 ft, neon, argon, folded paper

This piece examines surface quality and the unique light aspect that neon and argon posses to change the appearance of the object. Casting colored light altered the perspective and extent of the edges within the crevasses. Investigating how light sources change the color of surfaces which in turn results in a changing of the space. This piece also investigates the abstraction of geography and turning it into a different organic shape. Drawing inspiration from the Rocky Mountains and being overwhelmed by the beautiful sunsets casting colored light over the white snow was the initial inspiration for this piece.

-undergraduate level

 

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HANNAH GASON
Australian National University
Canberra, ACT Australia

Frame Work

2014, 45 x 270 x 7 cm, kiln formed glass, steel, copper. Photo by David Paterson

I seek to create spaces that convey feelings of tension in balance. I explore abstract structures and aim to form systems of relationships and representations for an emotive world. My process uses pate-de-verre components assembled into three-dimensional images that play with shifting colour and textured light. Drawing on my inspiration of the natural landscape and suggested forms in architecture, these structures use mixed media matrices to contain and ground glass components and their intrinsic energy. Colour and pattern are key elements for my practice and I aim to create works that intrigue and offer another perspective to an imagined space.

-undergraduate level

 

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AMÉLIE GIRARD
Universidade Nova de Lisboa
Lisbon, Portugal

Building the Horizon

2014, 45 x 75 x 30 cm, cast glass, dyed raphia, found objects. Photo by Kane Hale

My work is an exploration of the poetry of everyday life. I find inspiration in the most simple things – all those things around us that we barely notice anymore, yet, conceal great beauty. I use glass to capture and cast light on that beauty, for beauty, to me, speaks of the very essence of the world.

-graduate level

 

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BRIANNA GLUSZAK
Alberta College of Art & Design
Calgary, AB Canada

*Included in juried selection catalogue - Selected Work

Wood Grain

2014, 11 x 11 x 5.5 in, hot worked, fused and cold worked glass, steel, wood

What entices me most about working with glass is the possibilities to create dimension within pattern. I look at things we encounter almost daily and dissect them into obscured images of themselves. By watching and thinking about what is constantly surrounding me I create patterns. Glass is a vehicle that productively manifests my creativity. Through experimentation in both the hot glass and cold working I am constantly developing ways of manifesting my patterns and experiences. This particular piece takes the dimension of murrine and juxtaposes it with the imagery of wood grain.

-undergraduate level

 

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RYLAND GULBRANDSEN
University of Wisconsin Stevens Point
Stevens Point, Wisconsin

*Included in juried selection catalogue - Selected Work

Reminiscent

2014, 6 x 16 x 12 in, cast glass, wood, honey. Photo by Anne Morgan

This work is tied to the idea of the self-preservation of a species. Bees have the most perfect survival structure. Acting off of instinct alone, without outside interruption, bees will thrive indefinitely as a species. I compare this idea to the notion that the human race, through the use of free will and thought, is on the decline because we no longer function in primal and instinctual ways as the bee does. The emptiness and decay of these combs reference the human race. I use honey in my work because it never fouls, symbolizing hope and the notion of self-preservation.

-undergraduate level

 

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AEJIN HA
Kookmin University
South Korea

Patterned 9

2014, 60 x 40 x 15 cm, fused glass

I represent myself with minimalism. Those patterns of glass appears my mind not to say much. Avoid to representing a real shape of thing. Simplicity of object drawing by geometric pattern, but movable each object. Because I don't want to stay in a one place.

-graduate level

 

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SARAH HARRILL
Alberta College of Art & Design
Calgary, AB Canada

The Evocative Memory of Quadra Island

2014, 15 x 6 x 6 in, blown form, cast and cold worked glass

Currently in my 3rd year at the Alberta College of Art and Design in the Glass Department, my art is continuously shaped from personal experiences. Currently, my conceptual practice focuses on vivid memories from when I visited Quadra Island, British Columbia. The evocative moments spent on the island burned in my brain, including the subtle elements of the nature on the island that surrounded me. Mountains, ocean, driftwood, granite beach, forests, and wildlife are the main entities that I form my work with. With a desire to remain in those captivating moments of pure beauty and freedom, I create my art in hopes that the viewer will sense the emotion of natural beauty and memory that I am faced with.

-undergraduate level

 

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CHRISTINE HEIMERMAN
University of Texas at Arlington
Arlington, Texas

Barriers

2014, 20 x 31 x 4 in, photography and glass

My work is focused on memories and creating pieces of art that define my past. Why do we remember somethings and not others? This question drives my process to explore materials that can produce interesting and complicated patterns. Currently my work explores the fading and distortion of memory, that not only defines my past, but are the catalyst for the present. I often combine light, photography, and my own personal history, as a means to address the significance and flawed nature of how we remember. By distorting the image as it falls on varies types and sizes of clear roundels, and by keeping part of the image in focus, creates a visual dynamics within an installation. The reflection and shadows become a mesmerizing dance of color that I find very significant. They are the "marks of presents".

-graduate level

 

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JOSH HERSHMAN
Alfred University
Alfred, New York

***Featured in juried selection catalogue - First place

Derealization

2014, size varies, cast glass, fused glass, alternative photo process, ceramic decals, tripod

By using these sculptures as actual functioning cameras, I manipulate light and encourage alternate ways of looking at photography by allowing the optical and fluid qualities of glass to bring new meaning and depth to the photographic image. Enabling the work itself to capture these forces, the invisible and counter-intuitive nature of light is revealed. Using the camera as a point of departure, I emphasize the aesthetics of its design, functionality, and iconic meaning, effectively demonstrating how images can both shape and distort our culture, memories, and global consciousness.

-graduate level

 

 HoJasmine_Symbiosis.jpgJASMINE HO
California College of the Arts
Oakland, California

Symbiosis

2014, 11 x 12 x 11.5 in, blown glass, wood

My work discusses the diminishing gap dividing the natural and technological worlds. As nature and technology continue to grow and exist together, they change and adapt to each other in order to survive. Contrasting natural materials with the process and chemical history of glass and eventual 3d prints of photopolymer, I create creatures that represent the core spirits of nature and technology, and the scenarios in how they combine and affect each other.

-undergraduate level

 

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ERIN HOFFMAN
Tyler School of Art at Temple University
Philadelphia, Pennsylvania

**Included in juried selection catalogue - Honorable Mention

Intertwined

2014, variable size, yarn burned out in kiln with glass frit

The yarn burn out process shows the versatility of glass when there are set variables and openness to material transformation. Glass frit was massaged into yarn and then laid into a kiln. Through the firing process the yarn pieces took on their own forms. While I can control the color, size, and amount of frit the yarn will move freely into their own creations. The process embraces uniqueness, letting go of control, and finally allowing the glass yarn to live outside the kiln as sculptures frozen in time.

-undergraduate level

 

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SHANE JOHNSON
University of Wisconsin Stevens Point
Stevens Point, Wisconsin

Neurasthenia

2014, 14 x 3 x 13 in, kiln formed glass, plaster, steel. Photo by Anne Morgan

I create sculptural object utilizing glass and steel to visually interpret poignant human emotion.

-undergraduate level

 

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SU-YEON KIM
Southern Illinois University Carbondale
Carbondale, Illinois

Remains

2014, 8 x 3 x 0.7 in each (average), pate de verre glass, personal receipts

My work “Remains” is based on my habits that keeping the receipts and place it all over my personal space. I believe that these receipts can be an evidence of my existence in the real world. I wanted to change the receipts, which is a disposable and valueless object, to rigid and meaningful form. By changing the receipts from paper to glass, it became rigid but fragile, light but sharp object. When I am collecting receipts the contents on the receipt is not important to me anymore and for this the text on my glass receipts became blurry and ambiguous.

-graduate level

 

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LEAH KUDEL
Alberta College of Art & Design
Calgary, AB Canada

**Included in juried selection catalogue - Honorable Mention

I really feel like we have a connection

2014, 8 x 5 in, blown glass, plasma neon. Photo by Joe Kelly

My art practice revolves around the idea of absence, specifically negative space. I am fascinated by how the absence of something becomes highlighted solely because of the fact that something or someone no longer exists. The absence in a sense materializes. I love attempting to highlight the negative spaces between people through the use of objects that initiate uncanny social interactions.

-undergraduate level

 

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JAMES LABOLD
Ball State University
Muncie, Indiana

Reaching Across the Aisle to Revive the Horse we've Already Beaten

2014, dimensions variable - wingspan of horse 40 in, neon, mold blown glass, found objects, mixed media

My work has its foundations in American history and contemporary culture, who we are and where we have come from, and how we create modern myths. In history truth and fiction blend, leaving the question: who are we if we don't really know where we came from? My work both questions and embraces the mythologizing of history and attempts to create a new mysticism out of this By appropriating classical and Americana imagery, modified and combined with both contemporary and pseudo-mystical elements I hope to create a new context and dialogue about who we are and where we are going.

-graduate level

 

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JARED LAST
Alberta College of Art & Design
Calgary, AB Canada

Untitled (Leviathan)

2014, 8.5 x 8 x 24 in, blown and sand carved glass

My work prior to my introduction to glass blowing primarily consists of large scale meticulously patterned stencils and paintings inspired in part by optical art and cymatic geometry, which, until recently, eluded me in glass. This past year I have discovered how to map and cut out these same patterns over the three dimensional form by hand, wherein they are then taken to the sandblaster to be completed, almost the exact opposite of the aerosol paint application process. Untitled (Leviathan) is one of my first completed sand carved works!

-undergraduate level

 

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CASSANDRA LAYNE
Australian National University
Canberra, Australia

A Thought Partially Rendered

2014, 21.5 x 43 x 2 cm, kiln-formed and cast glass. Photo by Greg Piper

My work is about the link between thought and object, creating an abstract representation of how I imagine thoughts to appear in a physical space. If thoughts can lead to the creation of an object, can the thought itself, be an object? My work is informed by Cartesian Dualism philosophy. According to this philosophy the mental does not have extension into space and the material cannot think. At some point these two must cross to produce an object from thought. It is this crossing that I try to capture, the moment a thought enters over from the purely mental and into a material form.

-undergraduate level

 

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EUNJI LEE
Southern Illinois University Carbondale
Carbondale, Illinois

Pasrasent I : The Ant House

2014, 18 x 23 x 1.5 cm, Pate de verre fused frit glass, enamel, coldworked and polished

‘Pasresent.’ It is a mixed word, the past and the present. I made this new word because I consider the past and the present to be the same. My present is caused by my past and cannot be separated from it. I am inspired by my past the most. I value my old days and memories whether they are good or not. Home is the place where I feel the safest in the world. When I was young and saw objects that resembled a house, I always imagined as if somebody lived inside of it. I imagined what the ant house would look like under the ground when I found the ant hole in our yard. I drew and painted the interior of these imagined houses into my sketchbook, and that was my favorite play when I was a child. Now I am continuing my favorite play with glass instead of paper. With glass, my artwork has more depth than when I used to work with paper.

-undergraduate level

 

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ANNA LEHNER
University of Wisconsin Stevens Point
Stevens Point, Wisconsin

**Included in juried selection catalogue - Honorable Mention

Contagion

2014, 8.5 x 5.75 x 39.5, pate de verre glass

My work is strongly influenced by music, landscapes and the interest in the unknown. The motion in which music is executed, the way that landscape rolls as you move along are all very intriguing to myself. I look for simplicity in these moments and inspiration from materials. I investigate the quiet moments: space between notes in music and pauses between words. I aim to shift perception and develop questions of existence.

-undergraduate level

 

QIANG LIU
University of Wisconsin Madison
Madison, Wisconsin

VIDEO - Air Pollution

2014, 50 x 60 x 17 in, pate de verre and kiln-formed glass, video, monitor, photograph

DESCRIPTION - This conceptual work is consisted of three parts, Glass mouth mask, video and a background. Glass mimics a one-day used mouth mask which is dirty because the bad air. Video combines a forecast performance with an episode of real news. I acted forecaster to report the serious air pollution issue. The background shows the process of transforming from the Green Screen form to a “real” forecast form. I use hundreds of real mouth masks to make a Chinese map which shows PM2.5 result. Black shows the most worst air pollution, the red is worse, yellow is good, green and blue are the area with good quality of air. I put the video part of this work on Youtube. It is Chinese base forecast.

STATEMENT - The inspiration of “Air Pollution” comes from my experience that went back China this May. I was in sick since serious air pollution. I coughed, sneezed and ran nose all the time. People wore mouth masks all days. A clean mask became dirty in a day. I thought about that China is considered as the “world factory” and we use Chinese productions everyday. This is the benefit from the industrial civilization, but we also pay a heavy price for that. The air pollution isn’t only in China but worldwide problem.

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MEREDITH LOPEZ
Rochester Institute of Technology
Rochester, New York

Bittersweet

2014, 9.5 x 47 x 15 in, cast cane and pate de verre glass, ceramic, mixed media

Introspection is a practice that leads to understanding of one's nature and being, and is the motivational force behind my work. In observing the flaws and shortcomings that define elements of my own character, I struggle with all that I perceive as myself, juxtaposed against who I aim to be. I am fascinated with issues related to internal conflict, in conjunction with how we might perceive our own personal growth. My work unites elements of narrative and sculpture to serve as modes of investigation to find meaningful connections between things observed, imagined and that which is aspired to be.

-undergraduate level

 

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MADELINE MARTIN
Rochester Institute of Technology
Rochester, New York

**Included in juried selection catalogue - Honorable Mention

Duck and Cover

2014, 6 x 3 x 2.5 ft, glass, 1950's desk, rusted metal, tea dyed paper, fishing line

Civil defense classes became standard in public schools. Students learned about radiation, hydrogen bombs, and survival techniques. Duck and cover was the most used and common drill in schools. Teachers were encouraged to perform drills where they would suddenly yell, "Drop!" and students were to duck down and hide under their desks with their hands around their heads and necks.

-undergraduate level

 

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ALICIA MCCLOSKEY
Tyler School of Art at Temple University
Philadelphia, Pennsylvania

Intimate Formality

2014, 1 x 5 x 2 ft, mold blown glass and wood

Intimate Formality is a contrast between the comfort of the glass community and the regulated setting of the gallery space. The pedestal has a duality between acting as a functional object to hold the pillow and a theoretical place for the body to relax. As a student the studio becomes my living and working environment, blurring the lines between rest and work.

-undergraduate level

 

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WILLIAM MELL
University of Wisconsin Stevens Point
Stevens Point, Wisconsin

Exposure

2014, 19 x 9 x 13, hot sculpted glass, silicone, plaster, paint

I find so much beauty in anatomical form and the intricacy that is found beneath the surface of life. Through life-like structures I try to bring a harmony between the physicality and emotions evoked through anatomical structure.

-undergraduate level

 

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MARÍA RENÉE MORALES
Vicarte, Universidade Nova de Lisboa
Lisbon, Portugal

*Included in juried selection catalogue - Selected Work

FRECUENCIA ETÉREA

2014, 3 x 6 x 2 m, slumped float glass, wire, light. Photo by David Pereira

Through my work, I intend to explore the interaction between matter, space and body, the transition of surfaces and its textures, the space occupied by objects and also the “unoccupied” space. In this body of work, a sequence suggested movement through the repetition and the shift of an individual wave from its original position. In the interim, each piece spun on its own axis. Light played an essential role, stealing the “skin” of glass while passing through it. The shadows projected on the wall created a body greater than the space occupied by glass.

-graduate level

 

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JON MORENO
Alfred University
Alfred, New York

*Included in juried selection catalogue - Selected Work

Weathered

2014, 12 x 13 x 11 in (each), blown, carved and sandblasted glass, adhesive. Photo by Shaun Griffiths

Prompted by research on the international style of architecture, this material exploration of the Sydney Opera House involves themes of memory, its deterioration, and my relationship to those experiences. These forms depict how a single occurrence can exist in different states, weathered by time, altered by the subjectivity of memory, giving different perspectives of a once clear single event.

-undergraduate level

 

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ALEX MORRISON
Rochester Institute of Technology
Rochester, New York

Progression

2014, 6 x 6 x 50 in, blown glass, rope. Photo by Madeline Becker

I create art that explores the balance of glass as a craft and a fine art. I aim to utilize glassblowing techniques to create work that takes advantage of the unique capabilities of glass, such as transparency and the distortion of light. Traditional glassblowing is used as a basis for work, and then sculptures are created that move away from the established glassmaking approach.

-undergraduate level

 

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CHRISTOPHER MOSLEY
Salem Community College
Carney's Point, New Jersey

Hang the Hangers

2014, 17 x 5.5 in, found objects, flameworked and lost-wax cast glass

Glass is alive, it has a mind of it’s own. Glass to me is a mystical medium. It has these alchemical, and other dimensional properties to it. My art is inspired by my visions and ability to look into lucid dreams and see other worlds. When I’m creating with glass I’m trying to create my own world, which is unique and different from this, mundane, boring world we deal with in our everyday lives. When I’m in the now with glass, it allows me to travel to another realm, where time disappears and all my senses heighten.

-undergraduate level

 

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JENNIFER MULLIGAN
National College of Art & Design
Dublin, Ireland

Distort 2

2014, 5 x 6 x 6.5 in, blown glass, coldworked lenses

My interests lie in the examination of self-awareness, how we perceive the world and our perception of self-identity. I aim for my pieces to be engaging and interactive, to give a personal and individual experience to the viewer. Through the distortion of vision and blurring of perspective I question what we see as reality and challenge our assumptions. My work examines the question of self-identity, particularly in a world that is becoming more and more online based. I wish to visually play with the offline experience of self and reconnect the viewer with their own visual sense.

-undergraduate level

 

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LOUISE MURPHY
National College of Art & Design
Dublin, Ireland

Untitled

2014, 30 x 30 x 20 cm, pate de verre cast and lampworked glass

Having grown up in rural Ireland I find that I have been strongly influenced by nature. In recent years the plants and flowers that surround by home have made frequent appearances in my work. As such when approaching this project the Iris flower, which grows in abundance in rural Ireland, was my source of inspiration.

-undergraduate level

 

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LISA NAAS
Edinburgh College of Art at the University of Edinburgh
Edinburgh, United Kingdom

*Included in juried selection catalogue - Selected Work

Embodiment

2014, 46 x 31 x 12 cm, modified pate de verre kiln-formed aventurine blue glass

“Embodiment” is the first of a series of works in progress considering the idea of the Self that continues to “be” while changing with the death of every moment. The particular glass technique is my own modified pate de verre. The result is extremely light glass pushed to its furthest fragile limits and yet the shape still holds. This glass piece hangs by one strand of fishing wire, turning in the air and allowing light to catch the unique qualities of the aventurine blue and changing the viewer’s perspective of it by the moment.

-graduate level

 

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TATE NEWFIELD
Rochester Institute of Technology
Rochester, New York

Eye Candy Birds

2013, 4 x 6 x 3 in (each), blown glass

My goal is to master glassblowing. As I take steps towards my pursuit, my work has gone in many conceptual directions, but has always used the glass bubble as its foundation. As a student I try not to limit myself by doing series of work because that takes too long and in that time I could be exploring everything else. I am currently trying to explore everything else. This collection of birds is an exception. I know very little and the little that I know is probably wrong. I want to influence young people to stay happy and interested.

-undergraduate level

 

Cinderblock Hitting Cinderblock from Michelle Pennington on Vimeo.

MICHELLE PENNINGTON
University of Texas as Arlington
Arlington, Texas

VIDEO - Cinderblock Hitting Cinderblock

2014, Video (object - cast glass, fabricated steel)

Sometimes humans become consumed by banal rhythms and patterns that devour our daily lives and force us to question the choices that we make along the way. We may realize that some of the choices might actually cause a negative effect on our emotional foundations. I want to exploit the stress that gets built up and ends up weakening our spirits while causing this sort of fragility, as the infrastructure of our lives begins to become brittle, weak, and slowly wears away.

-graduate level

 

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CLARE PETERS
Australian National University
Canberra, Australia

*Included in juried selection catalogue - Selected Work

Community

2014, 59 x 59 x 2 cm, pate de verre glass on heat treated copper sheet. Photo by David Paterson

With a background in health, I have witnessed the fragility of the human body, but also the great strength that arises, when one is supported or is held in community. The fragile brittle nature of glass, in combination with light, resonates with these ideas. I aim for my work to evoke a sense of hope and comfort to the viewer. I want it to uplift and restore, and to convey ideas of relationship. I desire for the beauty and hope in life to be revealed, and thus bring a sense of encouragement and support.

-undergraduate level

 

COULAGE from leana quade on Vimeo.

LEANA QUADE
Alfred University
Alfred, New York

*Included in juried selection catalogue - Selected Work

VIDEO - Coulage

2014, Video (16 x 16 x 47 in, molten glass, water)

Intense heat, luscious light, and erratic fluidity are a few fascinations I have with glass as a material. My latest two bodies of work are about exploiting glass in a surrealist sense that invites the viewer to question the material and what they are seeing. The spring/spirals series flaunts how glass can bend, stretch and twist, a property many people think glass cannot achieve. The Coulage series shows off the beauty of light, heat, and fluidity of glass in its molten state, a characteristic most people never experience. Both series give the viewer a chance to see glass in a new way and think twice about how it acts, moves and functions, forming new questions to its potential and possibilities. My goal in developing these series is to inspire curiosity by revealing the mystical properties of glass and shedding new light on the surprising characteristics and capabilities of glass.

-graduate level

 

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LAURA QUINN
National College of Art & Design
Dublin, Ireland

Power in Nature

2014, 20 x 25 x 25, flameworked borosilicate glass

I have experienced many glassmaking disciplines such as casting, blowing, lampworking, engraving, enameling and fusing. The process I am currently most interested in is lampworking. This piece is reflective of some of my recent research into the physical manifestation of power in nature, such as horns on an animal. I wanted to create a physical manifestation of female power, thus the shape of the piece is derived from the uterus. I am interested in creating extensions from the body and how the body can seem to be part of the piece.

-undergraduate level

 

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LILY RAWSON
University of Wisconsin Stevens Point
Stevens Point, Wisconsin

Vestige

2014, 9 x 3 x 4 in, slumped glass, leather, thread, chair. Photo by Jeff Tomlinson

Stories, whether oral, written, or visual are the remnants of memories. I am drawn to stories depicting humanity; the struggles we encounter within ourselves and how we reconcile these struggles. These stories are never completely understood or finished. Instead they are constantly revised, revisited, and rewritten as we carry them with us. I seek to create a physical memory or story by reflecting on tangible representations of emotions. It is my hope that the viewer can both reinterpret and consider their own stories when looking at these pieces, to sense a lingering memory that is both their own and universal.

-undergraduate level

 

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EVA REDDY
National College of Art & Design
Dublin, Ireland

Diana

2014, 7 x 9 x 0.2 in, sandblasted flash glass

Diana The Huntress, a Roman Goddess of the hunt. She stood as guardian of the forest and of the animals who resided within. A copy of an early fresco of her hung in my living room as a child and though she was beautiful she looked so weak. I aimed with this piece to portray her as the strong guardian she was. I used Bold colours and created a fragmented and wispy atmosphere, reminiscent of the fresco.

-undergraduate level

 

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JON REES
Rochester Institute of Technology
Rochester, New York

Kahn's Corridor

2014, 24 x 36 x 10 in, sheet glass, light, shadow. Photo by Catherine Hellsten

Drawing inspiration from Louis Kahn’s Salk Institute in California, Kahn’s Corridor distills the experiential qualities of the building into their fundamental nature and conveys them through the medium of glass. It’s about the interplay of light and shadow, born from form and suggesting further forms. Kahn sought the fundamental nature of things and was enamored of light and shadow, as shown in his poetry: “.....the source of new need, meets Light, the measurable, giver of all presence, the measure of things already made, at a threshold which is inspiration, the sanctuary of art, the Treasury of Shadow.

-graduate level

 

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KRISTEN ROCKEY
Sheridan College
Oakville, ON Canada

GMO

2014, 5.5 x 5 x 2.5, kiln-cast crystal glass

As someone who grew up in a small town in Ontario, I have always pulled inspiration from the people, wildlife and rural animals around my hometown. This interest in animals and figures has developed into an exploration of form. Often I sculpt animals or people and then alter the proportions, sometimes twisting and contorting the form, splicing features from one animal into another. Doing this allows me to explore my inner thoughts about my own personal conflicting sense of self.

-undergraduate level

 

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MICHELLE RYAN
National College of Art & Design
Dublin, Ireland

Reclamation

2014, 7 x 9 x 0.2 in, sandblasted flashed glass

I am interested in buildings and objects that tell stories about the lives of the people who live there, both past and present. I explore this interest through drawing and making. As a material, glass has a close relationship with architecture and human history, and heightens this narrative.

-undergraduate level

 

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VERENA SCHATZ
Institute for Ceramic and Glass Art
Höhr-Grenzhausen, Germany

Gravity Pieces

2013, dimensions vary, blown glass, mixed media

One of the aspects that intrigues me the most within the medium glass is its soft and fluid state. In glass objects as we know them, this state is hidden. These objects deal with the concept of gravity, the freezing of time and movement. I often use the material as a tool to sensibilize the observer for his surroundings and to further make aware of the relativity of our perception.

-graduate level

 

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BRANDON SMITH
Southern Illinois University Carbondale
Carbondale, Illinois

Just Breathe

2014, 60 x 18 x 44 in, glass tube, found object, earth and seed, fabricated metal

My work has always utilized the natural world. I enjoy the semiotics; nature representing itself as well as a larger contextual idea. Nature is life. Life is relationships and interactions. Although we seem far removed from it today as a species, it is always coursing through us. Recently, my work has been re-examining one’s self within the context of todays society. I have been working with symbolism through organic matter, blown/ hot sculpted glass, multiples, and found objects. I don’t hold myself to one specific technique. I let the idea choose the process and materials; not be governed by them.

-graduate level

 

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KRISTIAN SPREEN
Sheridan College
Oakville, ON Canada

Melting Ice Decanter Set

2014, 8 x 6 x 6 in (decanter) 3 x 3 x 3 in (each glass), blown, engraved and flame polished glass, cork

I am currently enrolled in the Craft and Design program at Sheridan College, specializing in glass. As an artist and designer, I am drawn to the unique qualities of glass and make a conscious effort to produce work that could not be made with any other material.

-undergraduate level

 

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VALI STEELE
University of Miami
Miami, Florida

Nature Series: Number One

2014, 17 x 13 x 6 in, fused glass, plexiglass, wood, LED lights, organic materials

In my Nature Series I hope to create an individualized and ephemeral experience. By combining organic materials, glass and light I make an unrepeatable and spontaneous event trapped within the glass. The ambiguous images are left open for the viewer’s specific interpretation.

-graduate level

 

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JEFFREY STENBOM
Tulane University
New Orleans, Louisiana

My Affliction

2014, 12 x 12 x 0.5 in, kiln formed glass

I believe glass is very much like a person, filled with potential, beauty, and emotion. Glass is so strong but so weak at the same time. Everyday there is a new unknown discovery just waiting to happen. Glass pushes every emotion for me. It is a mental and physical challenge that connects my soul to creativity. The process of creating is a journey for me with endless possibilities.

-graduate level

 

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MAIA STERN
Cleveland Institute of Art
Cleveland, Ohio

The Royal Deck

2014, 2.5 x 3.5 in, copper and glass, champlevé

Almost every person has used playing cards. There are collector cards made with highly decorative motifs, cards sizes range from minuscule to enormous, yet people keep wanting more cards, new cards. “The Royal Deck” takes the playing card and shifts the material to one that is much heavier, copper and glass. There is texture by etched grooves of the hair and jewel like color filling individual wells. “The Royal Deck” reminds people of the value of cards, a simple deck that allows different games, bonding, entertainment, more.

-undergraduate level

 

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LUSIA STETKIEWICZ
Alberta College of Art & Design
Calgary, AB Canada

Thaw

2014, 6 x 3 x 0.5 ft, blown glass, steel, collected snow, daylight

The experience of light and dark speaks philosophically to the duality of good and bad and literally shows us illumination and shadow. I am acutely aware of light and dark stemming from an upbringing in sub-arctic, rural Whitehorse, Yukon, Canada. Whitehorse is north of the 60th parallel, creating summers that have almost twenty-four hour daylight, and winters with nearly the exact opposite. My work explores these themes incorporating glass and ice or snow freezing and melting with only natural lighting. I explore what can be vulnerable in the darkness and what is exposed in the light.

-undergraduate level

 

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MELONY STIEBEN
Alberta College of Art & Design
Calgary, AB Canada

**Included in juried selection catalogue - Honorable Mention

Under a Scope

2014, 12 x 16 x 0.125 in, frit and powder glass, plaster drawing. Photo by Joe Kelly

Patterns in nature have always captured my attention, creating the allure to continually explore their intricacies. The microscopic world hides from our unassisted eyes to reveal intensely intricate structures when we look through the microscope. Radiolarian and diatoms, in their intricacy and structure, has become the focus of my practice. My work replicates their intricate delicate structures and patterns creating a means to look at them without the use of a device, creating awareness to an otherwise invisible entity.

-undergraduate level

 

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REBECCA SZPARAGOWSKI
Southern Illinois University Carbondale
Carbondale, Illinois

*Included in juried selection catalogue - Selected Work

Crystal Landscape Study

2014, 5.5 x 6 x 2.5 in, fused glass

While the form mimics the swells of rolling hills, the landscape is only complete with the interaction of light.

-graduate level

 

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ERIN TAYLOR
Southern Illinois University Carbondale
Carbondale, Illinois

Transient Candela

2014, size varies, salvaged projector lens

My current work is an examination of perception that uses antiquated optical devices to examine our place in society. Objects that were once ‘the latest and greatest’ can be considered obsolete in only a few years time. I use lenses salvaged from equipment that society has deemed useless, breathing new life into them. The lenses become a device allowing for light to be captured and focused on a viewing surface creating ephemeral patterns. By exploring the optical aberrations and visual potential I hope to inspire people to see the inherent beauty in objects that are created to become instantly obsolete but still hold magnificent potential.

-graduate level

 

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KALLE TIIHONEN
University of Texas at Arlington
Arlington, Texas

Portrait of the Artist as a Young Bag

2014, 5 x 8 in, blown glass

I am fascinated by the hidden history of the everyday and in the subjective nature of cultural notions of normality. Through re-contextualization of the mundane I hope to uncover the expressive and unexpected potentials waiting within the overlooked and inanimate. I see working with glass as an interactive dialogue between maker and material, and seek to explore diverse themes such as memory, social structures and strictures, consumerism and throw-away culture, and others within this dialogue.

-undergraduate level

 

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LEAH WALDO
College for Creative Studies
Detroit, Michigan

Ascension

2014, 4.4 x 6.5 x 3.5 in, cast glass, slip-cast etched porcelain, stoneware

Glass is fragile and delicate- by juxtaposing it with the textured clay form, a conversation develops between two materials, a relationship that correlates to life: glass being the delicate and complex aspect of the soul and heart, the inner self, and clay representing the external self. By marrying the mediums of glass and ceramic, my work seeks to examine that relationship. Chinese philosopher Chuang Tzu coined the phrase “three in the morning”, which means seeing both sides of something without partiality- both are equally important. Thus, each part of an individual is crucial, both the internal and the external.

-undergraduate level

 

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ZAC WEINBERG
Ohio State University
Columbus, Ohio

Chandelier Arm Sketch

2014, 84 x 38 x 10 in, blown glass, paint can, latex paint, candle, monofilament

I am intrigued with our relationships to objects; how we allocate status to something depending on how and when it was made.

-graduate level

 

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RISTIINA WIGG
Alfred University
Alfred, New York

Livable Grid

2014, 17 x 22 x 15 in, sandblasted flat glass, wood, paint. Photo by Shaun Griffiths

The 1924 Schroeder House, Utrecht, The Netherlands, was designed with the precision of a Mondrian painting. By sandblasting crisp lines on glass panels, I merge exterior and interior space through reference to outside elevation, interior schematic, and the rectangular grid. These panels, randomly inserted into a slotted wooden base, can be slid back and forth, demonstrating the flexibility of the living space in this 1,200 square foot house. Displayed in darkness and lit from any side, lines and shadows create a living grid which reflects the complex nature of our lives.

-undergraduate level

 

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AMANDA WILCOX
Cleveland Institute of Art
Cleveland, Ohio

Patience

2014, 13 x 9 x 3 in, cast glass, laser etched mirror, laser etched biodegradable seed paper, screen print, digital print on silk

I am influenced by my background in humanities and philosophy and see these areas of research as passageways for understanding the hardships and the euphorias of the human experience. I seek this wisdom of the past within text books, old photographs, or images from the internet, but cannot help feeling a distance. A veil, the illusion of an idea of knowledge, rests between my perception and the source. I am focused on the transformation of our intangible past into a present, physical experience. I integrate use of technology and various material to illuminate illusions gathered within this search for information.

-undergraduate level

 

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LAUREN WILSON
Sunderland University
Sunderland, United Kingdom

**Included in juried selection catalogue - Honorable Mention

Reconstructed

2013, 41.4 x 20.5 x 1.5 cm, screen printed and kiln-formed glass. Photo by David Williams

Inspired by life experiences, Reconstructed expresses the breaking and healing of my jaw in surgery. Appearances on the surface against reality, which can be contradictory, is a comparison of internal versus external. The interaction between glass, image and light is exploited through layering and fusing. Deconstructing my X-ray by cutting printed glass, I have rearranged the fragments in the manner of a jigsaw, creating a lens-like quality giving movement to the image. This allows me to reveal how memories and feelings of the surgery have faded over time and are not visible on the surface, yet the evidence of the X-ray shows the medical alteration.

-undergraduate level

 

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RUBY WISNIEWSKI
Alfred University
Alfred, New York

Nakagin Capsule Tower

2014, 18 x 9 x 9 in, blown glass, flat glass, silicon glue, glow sticks. Photo by Shaun Griffiths

The Nakagin Capsule Building, an apartment complex in Japan, inspired this piece. The lit windows provide welcoming warmth encouraging the unquenchable curiosity of a voyeur. The repetitive units feel as though they could be picked up and moved, as the original building’s components were designed to do. Brightly colored building blocks, a size that can easily fit in your hand, embolden the inner child.

-undergraduate level

 

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LAUREN WOLFE-MILLER
Tyler School of Art at Temple University
Philadelphia, Pennsylvania

Habitat

2014, 36 x 36 x 36 in, found windows, rope, steel hardware, artist's bedsheet

Sculpture is a release for me to express situations I don’t understand, a lot of the time a reaction to social and emotional anxiety. Through this, I seek to purge the strangeness that dwells in non-verbal interactions between humans, objects, and spaces we hold dear. Using industrial materials and found objects, I utilize material associations to drive concepts, analyzing how their combination and juxtaposition can be used as a transformative aspect in the formation of a narrative. My work is driven by the potential of materials to generate a questioning and exploration of significance in common objects and materials.

-undergraduate level

 

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CAITLIN WOLLE
Columbus College of Art & Design
Columbus, Ohio

The Reef

2014, 4 x 12 x 8 in, kiln-formed puffy glass

I am working on the idea that mermaids are a much broader species than just simply being half-human and half-fish. The idea is that they are as diverse as any other fish, and these aspects affect them. Shown here is the coral reef in which these creatures inhabit. Puffy glass was chosen as the medium due to its ability to appear porous and decayed as the organic materials burn out in the kiln.

-undergraduate level

 

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MADISYN ZABEL
Australian National University
Canberra, Australia

Linear Flux 3

2014, 25 x 54 x 0.8 cm, kiln-formed and carved glass. Photo by Greg Piper

My work explores the nature of perception, and the relationship between two and three dimensional images and objects. It aims to encapsulate ideas of growth, movement and examine the relationships between positive and negative spaces. I use simple geometric shapes to explore these themes. Their regularity suggests organization, and the efficiency of their angles suggests structure. I find the triangle particularly suited to my work because of its capacity to have conflicting meanings. As a material, glass is crucial to my explorations for its illusionistic qualities when paired with light, layered or varying in thickness.

-undergraduate level

 

 

 



Juried Selection Digital Catalogue

COVER - 2014 Int Student Online Exhibit Juried Selection Catalogue.jpgThe digital catalogue features these selected artists chosen from the above International Student Online Exhibition by jurors Laura Donefer, Michael Endo, and Amy Morgan.

View the 2014 Juried Selection Catalogue on issuu.com

***FIRST: Josh Hershman
***SECOND: Kate Clements
***THIRD: Mary Ayling

AWARDS FOR 1ST, 2ND, 3RD - Each receive one complimentary year of GAS membership and a 2015 San Jose Conference t-shirt. First place also receives a free 2015 San Jose full-conference pass, with second place receiving a 50% discount off one pass, and third place receives a 25% discount off one pass.

**HONORABLE MENTIONS:
Erin Hoffman - Leah Kudel - Anna Lehner - Madeline Martin - Melony Stieben - Lauren Wilson

*SELECTED WORKS:
Jenna Borges - Alexandra Feeney - Brianna Gluszak - Ryland Gulbrandsen - María Renée Morales - Jon Moreno - Lisa Naas - Clare Peters - Leana Quade - Rebecca Szparagowski

 

 

Jurors for the 2014 Catalogue

The Glass Art Society would like to thank the jurors for generously donating their time and expertise.

Laura Donefer

Juror-LauraDonefer-Portrait.JPGArtist in Ontario, Canada lauradonefer.com

Laura Donefer has been using glass as her primary medium for more than thirty years, often in combination with diverse materials. Known for her innovative, colorful blown glass and flame worked “Amulet Baskets”, she also pushes the boundaries with work that explores ideas concerning memory, assault, bereavement, joy and madness. In demand as an exciting teacher, Laura has taught workshops and given lectures worldwide, including Japan, the United States, and Australia. Her work is many public and private collections, the Corning Museum of Glass, the Museum of Glass in Tacoma, and the Museum of Fine Art in Montreal to name but a few. Laura has been honoured with many awards, among them the “Lifetime Achievement Award” from the Glass Art Association of Canada, the prestigious “Honorary Membership Award” from the Glass Art Society, for her dedication to the glass community at large, and the International Flameworking Award for “extraordinary contributions to the glass art world.” Every few years Laura organizes one of her wacky, exuberant Glass Fashion Shows, a fantastical spectacle for the international glass community to enjoy. The next one will be in 2016, at the Corning Museum of Glass, and it will be over the top!! Laura lives in the wilds of Ontario, Canada, and in her spare time grows kale, hangs out with her dachshund, and kayaks the nearby waterways, loving and living her life to the fullest!

Michael Endo

Juror-MichaelEndo-Portrait-fromweb.jpgArtist / Curator at Bullseye Projects in Portland, OR michaelendo.com / bullseyegallery.com

Michael Endo earned an MFA in painting from Cranbrook Academy of Art, Michigan, in 2009 and a BA from Portland State University, Oregon, in 2005. His work has been exhibited internationally and has been selected for group and solo exhibitions. Endo now resides in Portland, where he continues his studio practice as as an artist and as a curator at Bullseye Projects.

 

 

Amy Morgan

Juror-AmyMorgan-Portrait.jpgOwner of Morgan Contemporary Glass Gallery in Pittsburgh, PA morganglassgallery.com

Amy Morgan, a native of Vineland, New Jersey in the heart of South Jersey’s glass industry, came to Pittsburgh and attended Chatham College from 1965-99. Her post-college professional work began in special events at the now closed Gimbels Department Store. She subsequently held many marketing positions from print advertising sales to TV PR for the local NBC affiliate. After many years as a partner in a two-person Boutique PR agency, and working prior to that in the world of fashion, she made a mid-life career change and established morgan contemporary glass gallery in 1997. The gallery has participated in the prestigious SOFA Chicago decorative arts exposition and has been one of 20 invitees since 1999 at the WheatonArts exposition, Glassweekend, in Millville, New Jersey. As Pittsburgh’s first gallery devoted exclusively to exhibiting studio glass, Morgan curates from 5-7 diverse, rotating group shows every year, representing the finest established and emerging artists working in glass. The gallery has come to be known as an enthusiastic supporter of new talent. Morgan participates in numerous professional panels regarding the gallery/artist relationship and is frequently asked to advise artists on their work and careers. She is a former vice president of the Ellsworth Avenue Business Association and a former chair of the Arts on Ellsworth Street Festival. She was a founding board member of the Pittsburgh Glass Center, and is currently on the advisory board at the Creative Glass Center of America. Morgan’s previous volunteer and/or board positions include working with the Forward Shady Corporation, the National Art Alliance for Contemporary Glass, and the Glass Art Society. A former board member of The Society for Contemporary Craft, The Pittsburgh Dance Council and the Jewish Community Center, she chaired the Art for Aids Auction for the Persad Center and served in lead positions on the committee for 8 years. Several years ago, Morgan was a committee member and participated in the national Glass Art Society and NCECA conferences in Pittsburgh.

 
 
 
 
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The Glass Art Society reserves the right to deny applications for Technical Display, advertising participation, GAS membership or the conference from anyone for any reason.