MEMBER MONDAY: MATTEO SEGUSO

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MEMBER MONDAY: MATTEO SEGUSO

posted on 9:55 AM, January 8, 2018
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Tell us about yourself! I was born in Venice in 1973 to Iolanda and Bruno Seguso. Since my birth, I have lived on the small island of Murano, known all around the world for its glass. 

After attending compulsory schools, and University, I was an electrician for a few years before I carried out my Italian Army Service.

In 1999 I started my career as glass engraver, attending the laboratory "Seguso & Linzi" the business of my father and his partner--learning from my father the art of glass engraving. After an apprentice period, and after learning the technique, during the years I worked with the most important glass factories of Murano and with many renewed artists and designers. 


In 2006, I opened my personal laboratory and in 2007 I started collaborating with Lino Tagliapietra, making the "battuto" on his works of art. Lino helped me to discovery the
American's glass world, a world that opened my mind, and helped me to grow professionally.

During the last five years I taught in several engraving and cold working classes at Pilchuck Glass School, at The Studio of Corning Museum of Glass, at Pittsburgh Glass Center and at Urban Glass.

I also have classes scheduled for the future in the United States and in Australia, and an important appointment for the GAS Conference 2018 in Murano with two demonstration in program.

                       
What draws you to the material you work with, and why have you
chosen the processes that you use in your work?

                       
Living in Murano, I love to think that my destiny to work with glass started when I was born.

In 1998, when my father was approaching retirement, during a normal conversation between us, like a joke, he asked me: “Would you be interested in being a  glass engraver like me?" My answer was “Why not?” 

So, on the January 1, 1999, I started my first day as a glass engraver. The first period was hard and I often felt out of place, but suddenly like magic, I fell in love with this art that I continue to love.


What themes do you pursue in your work?

I think, and I hope, to be an engraver and cold worker at wide range. This is the reason why I love to follow not just one or a few themes. I am always looking for new challenges, new experiences, exploring as much ways as possible to develop the engraving and cold work
technique. 

What is your dream project?

There is more than a dream project in my drawer, but for "good luck" I can't tell you!

If you weren't working in this field, what career would you choose?

Since childhood I dreamed of being or a helicopter pilot or working on theatre backstage creating scenes, light and special effects. Two jobs completely different and far from glass but always on my mind.

What's something about you that most people don't know?

I love adrenaline, for this reason I'm a scuba diver, a free climber, an airplane pilot. I have jumped with a parachute, I have done bungee jumping, paragliding and love exciting experiences.

Why are you a member of GAS?

I have learned that for anyone who works with glass, in a world where the glass is the lifeblood, being part of a "family" with which you can share, discuss and learn about this amazing material is very important and useful.

I think that GAS is one of the most important "families" between all the communities around the world. 

To see more of Seguso’s work, go here

 

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